Elected U.S. Representative for Nevada’s Fourth Congressional District Cresent Hardy speaks to a group of locals at a town hall meeting inside the White Pine Library on Dec. 13.  Garrett Estrada photo

Elected U.S. Representative for Nevada’s Fourth Congressional District Cresent Hardy speaks to a group of locals at a town hall meeting inside the White Pine Library on Dec. 13. Garrett Estrada photo

Though he hasn’t officially taken office yet, the soon to be Congressman representing Nevada’s rural fourth district, Cresent Hardy, held a town hall meeting with members of the public at White Pine County Library on Saturday.

Hardy spoke his opinion on a variety of topics, including  his displeasure with President Barack Obama’s latest executive order on immigration to how he feels Harry Reid has let Nevadans down.

“For the first time in my life, in the last 6 to 8 years, I’m terrified of what is going on in this country. My children, I don’t believe, have the same opportunities I did growing up,” Hardy said of the current state of the nation and politics in Washington.

Hardy said that he believes in a smaller government that gives more power to the states. It is the same platform that he ran on in the general election that won him over with more conservative leaning rural counties such as Ely.

In addition to politics, Hardy also mentioned the importance of faith and religion to him and how he feels the United States of America has wandered too far from being “one country, under god.”

“We are taking God out of this country. If we don’t focus on it, and don’t pray for our country, we are in trouble anyway,” Hardy said.

In response to a question from Ken Kliewer about how can America reestablish itself as the number one power over other growing countries such as China, Hardy said that he had given the issue a lot of thought.

The congressman-elect, who upset incumbent Steven Horsford, said that he loved traveling through rural Nevada, and that he planed to stop in Ely at least twice a year to receive input from locals on issues they want him to pursue in Washington. He promised that members of his staff would visit and take feedback from locals even more often than that.