Courtesy photo
Pony Express Re-Riders ready to make their ride to deliver the mail.

ELY, Nev. – Go back in time with the Pony Express train ride at the Nevada Northern Railway Museum Aug. 19, and relive the historic effort that tied the country together from east to west.

The working, living and steaming Nevada Northern Railway Museum brings together this unique experience. Their National Historic Landmark Post Office Car #20 will once again become an official United States Post Office. A postal employee will once again cancel mail in the car between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. with a special commemorative cancellation. Visitors are welcome to bring their mail to the car to have it cancelled or they can purchase a commemorative stamped envelope at the railroad.

Precisely at 4:30 p.m., the railroad’s original steam locomotive #40 will once again head up the hill to the old Ruth Mining District. Passengers will receive a commemorative envelope and stamp and witness a reenacted handoff to Pony Express riders played by the Ely Ghost Riders.

“This is a great way to experience a truly important part of our country’s history,” said Mark Bassett, president of the museum. “Passengers will experience firsthand how mail got across the continent as far back as 1860.”

The Pony Express was a predominantly horse-back mail delivery service that was the most direct means of east-west communication, connecting the new state of California to the rest of the country.

Visitors can keep their commemorative envelope and stamp, have it “canceled” by U.S. Postal clerks in the Post Office car, or place it in a Pony Express rider’s “mochila,” or pouch, to be handed off at Keystone, a replica of an actual Pony Express station.

Back in Ely, visitors will get a chance to talk with the Ghost Riders about the historic Pony Express and their annual participation in the nation-wide Pony Express reenactment.

The ride, which starts at 4:30 p.m. on Aug. 19, costs $39 for adults, $20 for children, and is free to small children (four and under). To get tickets, to find out more about the Pony Express train ride, or to learn more about the museum, go to nnry.com.